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Zemun
Zemun

Once a separate town, Zemun has been a municipality within the city of Belgrade since 1945. People have settled the area of Zemun as far back as the Neolithic, using the favourable position of the banks of the Danube and the Sava. The toponym Zemun arose with the arrival of the Slavs, based on the dugouts (“zemunice”) the first settlers lived in. The history of Zemun as a town in the contemporary sense of the word originates in 1717 with the arrival of the Austrians and its joining the Habsburg Monarchy. It became a significant fortification against Turkey and developed as an...

Restaurant Question Mark
Restaurant Question Mark

The oldest of Belgrade inns, The Question mark, is located in Kralja Petra Street 6 and is one of the symbols of Belgrade. Erected in 1823 as the property of Prince Miloš Obrenović, it was built by “masters from Grezia” in the Balkans style. It had changed owners and names since 1878. First it was called “At the Shepherd’s” in 1878, then in 1892 “At the Cathedral Church” but church authorities protested so the owner put the question mark sign at the door as a temporary solution and it remained there to this day. It housed the first billiards...

Savamala
Savamala

One of the oldest parts of Belgrade, the first to be built outside the walls of Belgrade Fortress and the first that most visitors encounter as it is located next to the train and bus station, Savamala was also once the center of the city. After the pedestrian zone was moved to Knez Mihailova Street, Savamala lingered as an industrial district. Decades later it was transformed into one of the most popular parts of Belgrade, and is now known as an urban design neighborhood. Savamala’s name comes from the river Sava and the Turkish word "mahala", which means settlement or a small...

Belgrade Fortress
Belgrade Fortress

The Belgrade Fortress changed and developed throughout the centuries, it saw many armies, was the field of many battles, it witnessed the brutality of the conquerors and the courage of the tireless defenders of the city. It was the place where Belgrade started to develop. The Fortress was built in stages, during the lengthy period between the 1st and 18th century, from a Roman castrum, through a Byzantine castle and the remains of the medieval capital of the Serb Despotate, all the way to an Austrian-Ottoman artillery fortification. The complex consists of the fortress itself, divided into...

Skadarlija
Skadarlija

Skadarlija as it Once Was This ambiental nook of Belgrade, still standing to this day, is preserved in the area of Skadarska Street around the bohemian Tri šešira inn. These were small houses, but a few of which remain. The house where the Tri šešira inn stands today is typical, built in the second half of the 19th century, the abode of former bohemians. The aqueduct of the Bulbulder waterway with 14 arches once stood in the middle of the mahala, in front of the subsequently built house of Đura Jakšić, as the sole reminder of times gone by. During the 19th...

Republic Square
Republic Square

The existing square was formed after the demolition of Stambol Gate and the construction of the National Theatre building in 1869. Stambol Gate, built by the Austrians at the turn of the 18th century, was located between the monument to Prince Mihailo and the National Theatre. The road to Istanbul (“Stambol”) led through it, lending the gate its name. In popular accounts the Stambol Gate became infamous for the Turkish custom of slaughtering Serbian rebels in front of it, using one of the most horrifying methods of execution – impalement. Following the establishment of...

Knez Mihailova
Knez Mihailova

Pedestrian zone and commercial center - Knez Mihailova Street is protected by law since it is one of the oldest and most important monumental urban environments. Knez Mihailova is composed of multiple buildings and representative houses constructed at the end of the 1870s. It is thought that the center of the population of Singidunum was established here during Roman times and that it was full of streets with gardens, fountains and mosques during the Ottoman Empire. After the elaboration of the Regulation of Urban Planning in 1867, the street was constructed rapidly to acquire its current...

Terazije Square
Terazije Square

The best known of the Belgrade squares began taking shape during the early 19th century. Prince Miloš Obrenović issued the order that Serbian artisans, particularly smiths and coppersmiths, were to be displaced from the township in the moat and that they are to build their houses and shops on the location of modern-day Terazije. The Belgrade municipality handed out lots on Terazije to all those willing to stake out a plot there. By introducing water to the township of Belgrade, the Turks built towers at fixed intervals along the brick-lined waterworks, to extract water by pipes so...

Nikola Pasic Square
Nikola Pasic Square

It was a barren meadow crossed by the Istanbul Road during the first half of the 19th century. A section of the road gradually became a street first called the “Sokače kod Zlatnog topa” (“Alley at the Golden Cannon”, after a nearby inn), then Markova Street. One of the largest Turkish mosques – Batal Mosque – stood near the place now occupied by the National Assembly, at the beginning of Vlajkovićeva Street. It was demolished in 1869. The square mostly housed ground-level and single-story houses after World War I. One of those housed the Court of the...

Kosancicev venac
Kosancicev venac

Kosancicev venac is located in the heart of the city. Paved with Turkish cobblestones, it has kept the atmosphere of the 19th century, with lovely cafés, galleries and wineries.Right here, on the 6th April 1941, the National Library was bombed and destroyed. Residence of Princess Ljubica, a private residence built by Prince Milos Obrenovic and dedicated to his spouse, is also located in Kosancicev venac. Every Saturday you can find here a lively atmosphere within a tourist tour “A Coffee with Princess Ljubica“ when curator of the Museum of the City of Belgrade dressed as...

Ada Ciganlija
Ada Ciganlija

Ada Ciganlija proudly bears the name of “Belgrade Sea”. Green, clean, equipped and relaxed, it becomes the favourite spot of Belgraders with the first signs of the spring sun. From the early mornings until late into the night, Ada Ciganlija is always lively. Ada Ciganlija was, in fact, turned into a peninsula by human hands, surrounded by an embankment and bounded by the Sava River on one and the Sava Lake on the other side. It has a surface area of approximately 800 hectares and is awarded with the Blue Flag, international recognition for the quality of the beach second year in...

Slavija Square
Slavija Square

The square was a marshy pond prior to 1880, where the citizens of Belgrade hunted wild ducks. The Scotsman Francis McKenzie purchased a large area above the modern-day square and parcelled it up to be resold, and thus its development began. McKenzie built the Peace Hall on Slavija in 1885, as the central building of the settlement, turning into the centre of the workers’ movement in 1910. The “Slavija” cinema stood there after World War II, until it was torn down in 1991. The “Slavija” Hotel was built between 1882 and 1888. The name Slavija originates with the...

Zoo – Garden of Hope
Zoo – Garden of Hope

Founded in 1936, it is one of the oldest animal collections in Europe. It was bombed twice during World War II, first in 1941 by the Nazis, then by the allies in 1944. Nearly all the animals were killed during the bombings, while some escaped their cages and roamed free around town. The contemporary zoo spans a surface area of 6 hectares, with over 2,000 animals from 200 species. On the occasion of its 60th birthday it was presented with a monument to its once most interesting and beloved of residents and the first chimp to arrive at the zoo, the ape Sammy. The Belgrade Zoo is open 365...