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Restaurant Question Mark
Restaurant Question Mark
Description

The oldest of Belgrade inns, The Question mark, is located in Kralja Petra Street 6 and is one of the symbols of Belgrade.

Erected in 1823 as the property of Prince Miloš Obrenović, it was built by “masters from Grezia” in the Balkans style. It had changed owners and names since 1878. First it was called “At the Shepherd’s” in 1878, then in 1892 “At the Cathedral Church” but church authorities protested so the owner put the question mark sign at the door as a temporary solution and it remained there to this day. It housed the first billiards game in Belgrade in 1834 and was the first reading room for the “Serbian Papers” from the same year.

Info
Address
Kralja Petra 6
Contact
+381 11 26 35 412
Location
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