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Nikola Pasic Square
Nikola Pasic Square
Description

It was a barren meadow crossed by the Istanbul Road during the first half of the 19th century.

A section of the road gradually became a street first called the “Sokače kod Zlatnog topa” (“Alley at the Golden Cannon”, after a nearby inn), then Markova Street. One of the largest Turkish mosques – Batal Mosque – stood near the place now occupied by the National Assembly, at the beginning of Vlajkovićeva Street. It was demolished in 1869.

The square mostly housed ground-level and single-story houses after World War I. One of those housed the Court of the Belgrade County (better known as the Peasant’s Court), turned into the ill-reputed Gestapo prison during the German occupation. The buildings of the National Assembly, Agrarian Bank, “Vreme” magazine (today’s “Borba”), “Beograd” cinema and a number of other buildings were constructed between the two world wars.

The urban and architectural shaping of the square began immediately after World War II, when the old buildings were demolished, the tram turn was moved, the fountain was built, the fences in front of the former royal garden and National Assembly were removed and a large number of buildings were constructed, including the Dom Sindikata (“Syndicate House”). The square was called Marx & Engels Square for a long time.

Info
Location
Info

It was a barren meadow crossed by the Istanbul Road during the first half of the 19th century.

A section of the road gradually became a street first called the “Sokače kod Zlatnog topa” (“Alley at the Golden Cannon”, after a nearby inn), then Markova Street. One of the largest Turkish mosques – Batal Mosque – stood near the place now occupied by the National Assembly, at the beginning of Vlajkovićeva Street. It was demolished in 1869.

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