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Slavija Square
Slavija Square
Description

The square was a marshy pond prior to 1880, where the citizens of Belgrade hunted wild ducks.

The Scotsman Francis McKenzie purchased a large area above the modern-day square and parcelled it up to be resold, and thus its development began. McKenzie built the Peace Hall on Slavija in 1885, as the central building of the settlement, turning into the centre of the workers’ movement in 1910. The “Slavija” cinema stood there after World War II, until it was torn down in 1991. The “Slavija” Hotel was built between 1882 and 1888. The name Slavija originates with the chief architect and it stuck to this day, remaining as the name of the entire Square. The other smaller buildings at the corner of Kralja Milana Street and the square, housing the famous “Tri seljaka” (“Three Peasants”) and “Rudničanin” inns, were torn down before and during World War II. The new hotel “Slavija” was erected in 1962. The square bore the name of the prominent leader of the socialist movement in Serbia Dimitrije Tucović for a while, with his monument set up at the centre of the square. Slavija is one of the main landmarks of Belgrade, an important nexus of traffic, but also an incomplete urbanistic environment with considerable work remaining to be done. Slavija is also one of the most demanding roundabouts you will encounter.

 

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Location
Info

The square was a marshy pond prior to 1880, where the citizens of Belgrade hunted wild ducks.

 

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