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Manjez Park
Manjez Park
Description

The Manjez Park, named after a riding school, is located in the city centre.

It was the place where the barracks of the Regimental Guard Cavalry were located until 1931. The park was built between 1931 and 1933, based on the designs from the General Plan from 1923. The park planner, engineer Aleksandar Krstić, is a pioneer of modern horticulture in the region. The park is one of the few green environments in the heart of the city, built between the two world wars and shaped according to the principles of the classicist style.

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Manjez Park

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