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Monument to Despot Stefan Lazarevic
Monument to Despot Stefan Lazarevic
Description

Author: Nebojša Mitrić (Upper Town; erected in 1982)

The bronze statue, 320 cm in height, depicts Despot Stefan. Belgrade first became the capital of the Serbian state during his reign. The monument was set up as a gift of the author to Belgrade on the 30 year anniversary of his artistic work. The plinth bears motifs with medieval symbolism and the inscription “I hath found the most beautiful place of antiquity, the overlarge city of Belgrade”.

 Despot Stefan Lazarević (1377-1427, Serbian ruler). Became prince at the age of twelve, following the death of Prince Lazar, his father, in the battle of Kosovo in 1389. Forged in battle (Rovine 1395, Nicopoli 1396, Angora 1402), always on the side of the sultan Bayezid, he became independent after winning his trust and turning to Hungary. Just as he gained Peć and Priština as the result of his services to Bayezid, he received Mačva and Belgrade as a gift from the Hungarians. Ranked highly among the knights of Europe. He was one of the most prominent of the twenty-four Ritter knights of the Order of the Dragon. Kept painters and architects, received the most famous writers from Greece (writer Andonius Rafailus) and Bulgaria (Grigori Camblak and Constantine the Philosopher) at his court. Founded the widely renowned school for the transcription and study of Greek texts and chronicles of national and world history at the newly erected monastery of Resava (contemporary Manasija). A writer himself, and thus each of his charters bears an introduction with the easily recognized style of the Despot. One of the best educated people of his time, he was, in fact, a representative of the Serbian Renaissance.

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