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Monument to Prince Mihailo Obrenovic
Monument to Prince Mihailo Obrenovic
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Author: Enrico Pazzi (Republic Square; erected in 1882)

Mihailo Obrenović (1823-1868, Prince of Serbia). The son of Prince Miloš and Princess Ljubica, he first came into power following the death of his elder brother Milan (1839). The sultan confirmed him to be an elected, but not a hereditary prince. Toma Vučić initiated an uprising in August 1842 and forced him into exile, bringing Alexander Karageorgevich to the throne. He spent six years outside the country and during this time assisted many Serbs working in literature (Vuk Karadžić, Đura Daničić, Branko Radičević and others). When Miloš returned to Serbia in 1858 Mihailo accompanied him and took over high command over the army. Regained the throne once more after the death of Prince Miloš in 1860. Established a national army with approximately 50,000 soldiers in 1861, aiming to finally rid Serbia of the Turks. Expecting war with Turkey he made alliances and agreements with other Balkan states – Montenegro, Greece, Bulgaria and Romania. Having finalized the preparations for war, he was assassinated during a walk in Košutnjak in 1868.

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