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Monument to Vojvoda Zivojin Misic
Monument to Vojvoda Zivojin Misic
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Author: Drinka Radovanović (At the Belgrade Fair; erected in 1988 on the 70th anniversary of the breach of the Thessaloniki front).

Vojvoda Živojin Mišić (1855-1921, Vojvoda - Field-Marshal, one of the most prominent Serbian military commanders). Took part in all Serbian wars between 1876 and 1918. During the Balkans and the early stages of World War I he was an assistant to the head of the High Command Staff. In the Battle of Kolubara he was the commander of the First Army, where he was particularly noted and received the rank of Vojvoda (Field-Marshal). During the breach of the Thessaloniki front (1918) he was the head of the High Command Staff, then the head of the General Staff until 1921.

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