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Museum of Automobiles
Museum of Automobiles
Description

The building housing the museum was built in 1929 as the first public garage in the city centre, designed by the Russian architect Valeri Stashevski.

It was named “Modern Garage” and declared a cultural heritage item. It housed the automobiles used in the First International Automobile Race held in 1939 in Belgrade.

 The collection contains a unique display of 50 old and rare automobiles – the oldest of them being a Marot Gardon from 1897, as well as the license plates, drivers’ licenses, the first traffic regulations and photographic recordings of the birth of automobilism in Serbia.

 

Info
Address
Majke Jevrosime 30
Contact
+381 11 30 34 625
Opening Hours

Open: Mondays – Fridays 11-19h

Info

Accessible to persons with disabilities

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