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Museum of Vuk and Dositej
Museum of Vuk and Dositej
Description

Founded in 1949, it is located in the building of the former Grand School, opened in 1808 as a lyceum by the great Serb luminary and first Serbian Minister of Education Dositej Obradović.

The museum contains a professional library, with a small reading room and consists of two parts – the ground floor contains an exhibit dedicated to Dositej Obradović, while the first floor is dedicated to Vuk Stefanović Karadžić.

Info
Address
Gospodar Jevremova 21
Contact
+381 11 26 25 161
Location
Opening Hours

Open: Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays 10-17h, Thursdays and Saturdays 12-20h, Sundays 10-14h, closed on Mondays

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